Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Forlane 6 Studio’s ‘Disoriented’ Installation an Underwater Adventure

French duo Forlane 6 Studio uses an atypical backdrop for their art installations: the depths of the sea. Hortense Le Calvez and Mathieu Goussin debuted Disoriented this year, an exhibition set in Vlychos Beach in Greece. Each of these show "explores themes of environmental dystopia, eco-anxiety, and the anthropocene.”

French duo Forlane 6 Studio uses an atypical backdrop for their art installations: the depths of the sea. Hortense Le Calvez and Mathieu Goussin debuted Disoriented this year, an exhibition set in Vlychos Beach in Greece. Each of these show “explores themes of environmental dystopia, eco-anxiety, and the anthropocene.”

Swimmers and divers can either visit the exhibition under the water or on its surface. There are nine large wooden sculptures of palm trees suspended in the water, between 2 to 5 meters in length.

From an official description: “Disoriented, imagines a story of seed migration. The coconut palm species is an extraordinary sailor, able to drift above the ocean during many months waiting to encounter a piece of land to grow onto. Palm trees rising, on previously barren islands, are often the result of such voyage. Which form could this resilient plant take, confronted to a world with higher sea levels and disappearing atolls? Unable to reach any dry sand, could the leaves take a downward direction and mimic the behaviour of the feather starfish? The work dreams an encounter between the two species caught in an aimless storm and moody currents. The arrows refer to the wind and current patterns found on weather charts with here no clear trajectory.”

Though the specific objects used offer something new, the pair aren’t the first to do an exhibit in the water. Artist Salvo Galano placed photos in Italian waters for a show in 2014. Jason deCaires Taylor’s shown eerie figurative sculptures lining the sea floor. In a more controversial move involving a waterway, artist Will Christo spent two decades planning “Over the River,” which would have stretched a shimmering cloth over six miles of the Arkansas River. The project was challenged and halted over concerns of its environmental impact.

Check out similar past efforts from Forlane 6 Studio below.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Cai Guo-Qiang's work, including the monumental “Sky Ladder,” transforms the space with seemingly minimalist strokes. However, much of the work comes out of meticulous planning and labored execution. Recent portraits also continue the artist's use of surprising materials, such as the gunpowder portraits below.
Aakash Nihalani’s street installations and gallery works give the illusion of three dimensions and a more malleable reality, allowing passers-by to inspect and engage with his new perspectives. The artist uses acrylic and Flashe paints to create these seemingly simple geometric forms. Nihalani was last featured on HiFructose.com here.
Looking toward Hi-Fructose's 14th year in publishing, the atrium at SCOPE Miami Beach (Dec. 4-9) will host three installation projects from the HOT TEA, Okuda San Miguel, and AJ Fosik. In the below Q&A, we talked to one of those artists, HOT TEA, about the evolution of his installation practice, traveling the world, and what he plans for the fair.
Skunk Control is an ensemble of educators, scientists, and engineers who create installations designed to inspire wonder and “prompt audiences to reflect, question and engage them in the art of discovery.” This immersive pairing of art and science implements electronics, advanced lighting and optics, and other technologies. Yet, often, the group’s gorgeous designs are the points of entry into the works, with the tagline "Where Science Meets Art." The group is based in Australia, at the College of Engineering and Science at Victoria University.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List