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The New Street Installations, Gallery Interventions of Aakash Nihalani

Aakash Nihalani’s street installations and gallery works give the illusion of three dimensions and a more malleable reality, allowing passers-by to inspect and engage with his new perspectives. The artist uses acrylic and Flashe paints to create these seemingly simple geometric forms. Nihalani was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

Aakash Nihalani’s street installations and gallery works give the illusion of three dimensions and a more malleable reality, allowing passers-by to inspect and engage with his new perspectives. The artist uses acrylic and Flashe paints to create these seemingly simple geometric forms. Nihalani was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

“Nihalani’s street installations, which are constructed from strips of instantly identifiable fluorescent tape, open up unexpected dimensions and often enlightening and humorous perspectives to the otherwise routine urbanscapes upon which they are affixed,” a statement from Tripoli Gallery says. “His pieces are meant to engage the public by creating environments that can be physically entered and explored from various angles, exposing unnoticed details, and transforming passersby or gallery visitors into active participants.”

See more of his recent work below.

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