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Armando Veve’s Bold, Meticulously Rendered Drawings

Armando Veve, a Philadelphia-based artist, creates drawings of surreal scenes and constructions, though each element is rendered in realism. His eye for detail works on granular level, with Veve’s slow and meticulous process producing countless dots and lines for one cohesive image. The style recalls both pointillism and vintage illustrations in reference books. And its striking results have garnered commissions from high-profile publications. Veve was last featured on Hi-Fructose here.

Armando Veve, a Philadelphia-based artist, creates drawings of surreal scenes and constructions, though each element is rendered in realism. His eye for detail works on granular level, with Veve’s slow and meticulous process producing countless dots and lines for one cohesive image. The style recalls both pointillism and vintage illustrations in reference books. And its striking results have garnered commissions from high-profile publications. Veve was last featured on Hi-Fructose here.



Veve’s work as appeared in the New York Times, Vice, New Republic, Bloomberg Businessweek, and several others. This year, Veve’s work was part of the group exhibition “1+()” at Global Network, The Seoul Illustration Fair. Though some of that work may not be as wild as his personal drawings, each of the objects in all of his creations have a sense of life to them as singular, tangible entities. Veve has commented on his tendency toward realism and seeing his work translated into other mediums.




“I am definitely interested in seeing these images activated in a sculptural realm,” Veve said in an interview with another artist. “The way I compose some drawings is very similar to how a sculptor arranges physical objects. I love to think of the drawings as blueprints for physical things.”

Check out Veve’s Instagram here.

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