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Brandon Locher’s Intricate ‘Maze’ Drawings

Brandon Locher is a New York-based visual artist and musician with a prolific output in both areas. His "Mazes to the Motherlode" portfolio contains 50 pieces of art created over the past few years. These ink and graphite labyrinths differ in approach and convolution, yet all are alluring in their intricacies.


Brandon Locher is a New York-based visual artist and musician with a prolific output in both areas. His “Mazes to the Motherlode” portfolio contains 50 pieces of art created over the past few years. These ink and graphite labyrinths differ in approach and convolution, yet all are alluring in their intricacies.

“With each new piece I’m always constantly trying to become more introspective and connected to my own individual journey,” the artist says, in a statement. “My method of working is generally always very premeditated and doesn’t allow much room for chance. Generally composition and ideas for new pieces sometimes takes as much time as physically drawing and executing them. As my work expands my ambitions become larger and as a result I find myself working slightly outside of my own means. Every future piece comes with it’s own unique set of challenges and constraints, as a result of always trying to better my own practice.”

See more on Locher’s “mazes” below.


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