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Benoit Jammes Photographs the “Secret Sporting Life” of Food

If you played with your food when you were a kid, then you might enjoy this set of wacky photographs by Benoit Jammes. The Paris based artist does just that in his playful series entitled "Skitchen" that explains "what's going on in your kitchen when you turn your back- the secret sporting life of our friends the fruits and vegetables."

If you played with your food when you were a kid, then you might enjoy this set of wacky photographs by Benoit Jammes. The Paris based artist does just that in his playful series entitled “Skitchen” that explains “what’s going on in your kitchen when you turn your back- the secret sporting life of our friends the fruits and vegetables.”


Old casette tape artwork, from Jammes’s “[o-o]” series.

Throughout all of his work, Jammes applies a clever sense of humor, describing his art as his own interpretations of everyday objects and cultural trends. A combination of pop culture references inhabit Jammes’s world, from skateboarding to music and television animation. Another of his series makes characters out of old cassette tapes. “Everything has the potential to inspire me because inspiration is everywhere: friends, comics or newspapers,” he says.

In his “Skitchen” series, ordinary fruits and vegetables like bananas, potatoes, and onions are depicted skateboarding through the kitchen, performing kickflips and nosegrinds over the sink and hurdles of soup cans, before they become chopped into pieces of someone’s dinner or a pool of ketchup. Jammes shares, “It’s great to do to things for the eyes with the hands,” Adding, “The aim is to spark an immediate reaction.”

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