Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Katsuyo Aoki Exhibits New Porcelain Sculptures in “Dark Globe”

Porcelain has been a highly prized material for centuries, impenetrable, tough and strong, yet it has the magical translucence found in sea shells from which it earned its namesake. These contrasting aspects of porcelain are what make it so fascinating for sculptor Katusyo Aoki, first featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 21, who has chosen this material to express a multitude of emotions. She is perhaps best known for her intricately carved skulls that are colored in a variety of pure white and blue tones, relating them to a macabre religious object. Her recent pieces have included associations to 18th century designs, Norse folk magic, and more modern references to abstract art, as in her taller, distorted pieces that resemble tree branches or ocean waves. For her current exhibition at Jason Jacques Gallery in New York, "Dark Globe", Aoki combines her swirling designs with regal, yet dark subject matter.

Porcelain has been a highly prized material for centuries, impenetrable, tough and strong, yet it has the magical translucence found in sea shells from which it earned its namesake. These contrasting aspects of porcelain are what make it so fascinating for sculptor Katusyo Aoki, first featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 21, who has chosen this material to express a multitude of emotions. She is perhaps best known for her intricately carved skulls that are colored in a variety of pure white and blue tones, relating them to a macabre religious object. Her recent pieces have included associations to 18th century designs, Norse folk magic, and more modern references to abstract art, as in her taller, distorted pieces that resemble tree branches or ocean waves. For her current exhibition at Jason Jacques Gallery in New York, “Dark Globe”, Aoki combines her swirling designs with regal, yet dark subject matter. This new exhibit includes her popular human skulls, divided into thee new series; her conceptual series “Loom” (first seen here), “Predicative”, and “The Void”, sculptures that resemble crowns, symbols representing power and glory, as well as the weight of responsibility. The crown takes on a variety of forms and context in Aoki’s exhibition throughout. As religious icons, they appear as a symbol of holy righteousness, but when placed on top of a skull, become a possible warning about the repercussions of the wearer’s reign. Take a look at more of Katsuyo Aoki’s recent sculptures below, on view through February 21st, 2016.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Even when he's playing with classical motifs, there's something unmistakably current about the sculptures and drawings of Thomas Lerooy. In recent work, his characters have cherubic bodies but golden skulls as heads. The effect is both humorous and slightly menacing, as these youthful creatures scale surfaces around the room.
Ellen Jewett, a self-described “sculpture artist and animal sympathizer,” crafts surreal scenes, taking inspiration from the natural world. Jewett says that at first sight, her work is a blend of "serene nostalgia" and a visceral interpretation of the wild, but "upon closer inspection of each 'creature' the viewer may discover a frieze on which themes as familiar as domestication and as abrasive as domination fall into sharp relief." Jewett was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 33.
Martin C. Herbst's “Spheres” are transforming, painted faces on stainless steel spheres, seemingly shifting expressions as viewers move the pieces or their perspectives. The artist was inspired by Parmigianino’s 1500s painting “Self-portrait in a Convex Mirror," known for its distorted effect. Herbst was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.
The work of Japanese artist Yasuaki Onishi has been compared to ethereal dreamscapes.  He creates complex shapes with simple materials like dyed hot glue, clear plastic, and thread that inspire the imagination.  Some see floating mountains, rain, and clouds, speaking to the broad scope of interpretation of his work.  While Onishi’s flowing linear installations are site specific, they also celebrate the ‘happy accident’.  Each piece begins with an organic object hung by fishing line, then connected to plastic sheets on which Onishi instinctively drizzles glue.  Once the glue is dry, a cast of the object is revealed.  Read more after the jump.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List