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Chiharu Shiota’s Recent ‘Drawings in Space’

Chiharu Shiota has called her thread installations “drawings in space.” Using antique furniture and other objects evoking memory, her work has explored how we're tethered to the past and each other. Shiota's work, and her performance art, has recently taken over spaces at KODE-Art Museum of Bergen in Norway, Museum Nikolaikirche in Berlin, Kenji Taki Gallery in Japan, and SCAD Museum of Art in Georgia. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.


Chiharu Shiota has called her thread installations “drawings in space.” Using antique furniture and other objects evoking memory, her work has explored how we’re tethered to the past and each other. Shiota’s work, and her performance art, has recently taken over spaces at KODE-Art Museum of Bergen in Norway, Museum Nikolaikirche in Berlin, Kenji Taki Gallery in Japan, and SCAD Museum of Art in Georgia. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

“With a background in painting and performance, Shiota has continued to develop her interest in the body and the bodily gesture in her installations,” a statement says. “The visual impression is both fragile and massive, and the body’s response upon entering into the work is an important part of the artist’s objective.”



See more of her recent work below.

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