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Amandine Urruty’s New Drawings Overflow with Fantasical Characters

Paris, France based artist Amandine Urruty has always overflowed her whimsical drawings with fantastical characters. First featured on our blog here, Urruty is unique in her near exclusive use of the pencil medium. There is something about a pencil's 'primitive' and simple nature that initially attracted her to it. Her illustrations exhibit a remarkable control of the medium, and despite its easy use, she says, she is able to embellish her work with detail and varied palette. Most recently, her palette is almost entirely monochromatic black and white.

Paris, France based artist Amandine Urruty has always overflowed her whimsical drawings with fantastical characters. First featured on our blog here, Urruty is unique in her near exclusive use of the pencil medium. There is something about a pencil’s ‘primitive’ and simple nature that initially attracted her to it. Her illustrations exhibit a remarkable control of the medium, and despite its easy use, she says, she is able to embellish her work with detail and varied palette. Most recently, her palette is almost entirely monochromatic black and white. Although her pieces are bizarre at first glance, to Urruty, there is a part of them that is personal and specific. She builds many of her images on second hand toys and personal objects, fashioning equally playful and wicked creatures from them. There is an endless procession of mysterious bed-sheet ghosts, children wearing animal masks, disco-ball headed figures and others. They continue to evolve in her latest series of drawings, which is currently on view at Cass Contemporary in Florida.

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