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Bruno Novelli’s Startling ‘Night in the Tropics’ Series

Artist Bruno Novelli excels in both color and blending patterns, and in his "Night in the Tropics" series, the latter is highlighted. His Indian ink works were inspired by an experience of the artist in the Amazon. Bruno Novelli Novelli last appeared on HiFructose.com here.

Artist Bruno Novelli excels in both color and blending patterns, and in his “Night in the Tropics” series, the latter is highlighted. His Indian ink works were inspired by an experience of the artist in the Amazon. Bruno Novelli Novelli last appeared on HiFructose.com here.

“I aimed a joyful way to deal with Brazilian and amazonian imagery, popular culture and deep experiences with the Huni Kuin myths,” the artist says. “The forest, specially through the Huni Kuin lens, is the theme and form the atmosphere for ‘Night in the Tropics.’ The sacred tea Ayahuska (or ‘Nixi Pãe’ in Huni Kuin language) is represented by the many vines that crosses in a wiry way good part of the drawings. I aimed to transmute, in a very personal way, my perceptions of the forest, the way Huni Kuin (the people of the boa constrictor myth) live Amazonia and its enchantments.”

See more of these works below.

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