Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Etienne Rey Sculpts Light and Space

Based in Marseille, French artist Etienne Rey creates sculptures and installations using light and mirrors. His site-specific installations respond to their physical spaces, creating unique situations. Rey's sculptures alter the conditions of their environments, changing, reflecting and refracting the light and sense of space. Motivated by a curiosity about the consciousness and science of direct experience, Rey uses his artworks to question and reveal the intricacies of human interaction and organization. As moving objects, Rey's sculptures are also bodies in space and one must negotiate how to move among these objects in the same way one approaches or avoids other persons.

Based in Marseille, French artist Etienne Rey creates sculptures and installations using light and plastics. His site-specific installations respond to their physical spaces, creating unique situations. Rey’s sculptures alter the conditions of their environments, changing, reflecting and refracting the light and sense of space. Motivated by a curiosity toward consciousness and science of direct experience, Rey uses his artworks to question and reveal the intricacies of human interaction and organization. As moving objects, Rey’s sculptures are also bodies in space and one must negotiate how to move among these objects in the same way one approaches or avoids other persons.

In “Vortex Monochromatique, Diffraction,” Rey turns a whirlpool on its side, giving viewers the singular opportunity to experience the bottom of a whirlpool while also admiring its complex geometry from the sides. “Vortex” isn’t Rey’s only installation that attempts to make the immaterial solid. Works like “Tropique” and “Spirale Polychromatique, Diffraction,” turn light into matter. Both immersive installations, “Tropique” places the viewer in the center of a light field, while “Spirale” makes the magic of stained glass windows palpable by stretching a supposed picture into individual planes. By using principles of geometry and architecture to sculpt light and space, Rey provokes ordinary perception.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
South African designer Justin Plunkett’s “Con/struct” series has more in common with the digitally-fabricated renderings of speculative architecture than documentary photography, but it illustrates an eerie collision of both formats. The images are built from a combination of photography, 3D modeling and substantial post-production editing, to form street-level perspectives of futuristic urban fantasies.

Oscar Oiwa brings his immersie mural work to USC Pacific Asia Museum with the new installation "Dreams of a Sleeping World." The artist describes this new work as a "360° dreamscape," created over two weeks and handrawn with 120 Sharpie markers. Oiwa was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

Brian Tolle's startling sculptures are said to be a dialogue between "history and context." His ability to manipulate what appear to be the most stubborn of structures is more than just a clever use of materials such as styrofoam and urethane (as is th case in the top piece, "Eureka.") Tolle forces us to consider our own relationship with the materials around us.
Dutch artist duo We Make Carpets recently presented a huge, immersive carpet installation for "Kneeling," their piece for the Salon del Mobile 2015 in Milan, which took place in mid April. We Make Carpets collect ephemeral, throwaway items like cone-shaped party hats and dish sponges and arrange them into elaborate patterns inspired by Middle Eastern carpet-making traditions. Their colorful works were laid out on the floor at the Salon horizontally rather than hung up on a wall like in a typical gallery, encouraging viewers to circle around the installation to get the full effect.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List