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Matthew J. Levin’s Mutating Statuettes

Alien meets House of Wax in Matthew J. Levin's melted, mutilated statuettes. The spine-chilling creatures have glistening skin stretching over elongated bones and folding over protruding ribs. Many objects appear organically self-actualized; as if the creatures emerged alone out of a solid substance. Though their appearances may be repulsive, Levin's method of positioning his small-scaled creatures in dance-like movements imbues them with a sort of grace and unearthly beauty.

Alien meets House of Wax in Matthew J. Levin‘s melted, mutilated statuettes. The spine-chilling creatures have glistening skin stretching over elongated bones and folding over protruding ribs. Many objects appear organically self-actualized; as if the creatures emerged alone out of a solid substance. Though their appearances may be repulsive, Levin’s method of positioning his small-scaled creatures in dance-like movements imbues them with a sort of grace and unearthly beauty. For example, in a series fusing human and horned animal, Levin’s characters take on the finesse of a ballerina. Woman-cum-antelope stands on the tips of her hooves and stretches her neck outwards, while another female character arches her back and thrusts her breasts forward. The Minotaur in the series bends at his knees but reaches outward. All three characters share long, spidery fingers that further exaggerate their elongated forms. The effect suggests propelled movement and the creatures’ desires to reach for unknown bodies.

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