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Veronika Richterova Creates Imaginative Sculptures from Plastic Bottles

A veritable expert on the subject of recycling, Czech artist Veronika Richterova uses PET bottles to create whimsical sculptures that are visually appealing and educational. PET bottles are the common, plastic bottles in which most soft drinks are sold. While easy to recycle and remake into other items, most people associate these bottles with pollution in the world's landscapes and oceans. With her imaginative sculptures, Richterova inspires her viewers to reconsider the waste they put into the environment and find creative, new uses of their discarded items. Check out her cactus-inspired plastic bottle sculptures below.

A veritable expert on the subject of recycling, Czech artist Veronika Richterova uses PET bottles to create whimsical sculptures that are visually appealing and educational. PET bottles are the common, plastic bottles in which most soft drinks are sold. While easy to recycle and remake into other items, most people associate these bottles with pollution in the world’s landscapes and oceans. With her imaginative sculptures, Richterova inspires her viewers to reconsider the waste they put into the environment and find creative, new uses of their discarded items. Check out her cactus-inspired plastic bottle sculptures below.

Photos by Michal Cihlář.

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