Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Zim & Zou’s Whimsical Paper Sculptures

Zim & Zou are a French artist duo that constructs colorful, exuberant paper sculptures with such immaculate craftsmanship, it's difficult to believe that their work is created entirely by hand. Composed of Lucie Thomas and Thibault Zimmermann, Zim & Zou met while studying graphic design and were united by their love of tangible media over design software.

Zim & Zou are a French artist duo that constructs colorful, exuberant paper sculptures with such immaculate craftsmanship, it’s difficult to believe that their work is created entirely by hand. Composed of Lucie Thomas and Thibault Zimmermann, Zim & Zou met while studying graphic design and were united by their love of tangible media over design software.

Since they teamed up, they’ve collaborated on installations at esteemed institutions like the Centre Pompidou in Paris and have created displays for big-name retail clients like Hermes. Working with a palette of neon greens, flamingo pinks, and electric blues, they base their sculptures on real life references that draw from both the natural world and technology. Whatever the subject of the piece, it undergoes a transformation and becomes playful and toy-like when rendered in carefully-trimmed layers of bright paper.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
In recent work, Gil Bruvel carefully arranges pieces of wood, with startling faces emerging. This is just one example of the sculptor’s work, which also spans metalworking, oil painting, and several other mediums. The artist’s larger sculptures, in particular, tend to render the human head in unexpected ways.
The laser-cut digital prints and pins that comprise works by David Adey, an artist based in San Diego, can be pulled from hundreds of Web or print outlets. Yet, together, they create cohesive, kinetic pieces like the powerful “Starbirth,” consisting of lips bursting out from the piece’s epicenter. All of the individual pieces are painstakingly pinned to a foam board.
While the kaleidoscope is an age-old technology, Gaspar Battha created an elaborate, futuristic sculpture that combines elements of this traditional construction with new media. Titled "Patterns of Harmony," the sculpture's multi-faceted surface fractures projections of repeating, electric blue cubes into moving, psychedelic visuals.
The wooden sculptures of Kiko Miyares appear as distortions of the human figure, with viewers often circling the work in disbelief. While some of his work is horizontal, the majority of his work vertically transforms the body into a new, perception-challenging object. His toying with color further pushes the surrealism of each subject.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List