Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Samuel Gomez Reveals New Largescale Drawings “Decrypted Savants” & “Oasis”

New york-based Dominican artist Samuel Gomez (first featured here) creates enormous detailed renderings with a steam-punk aesthetic. Using graphite and ink, Gomez's work offers a glimpse into a mysterious dystopian society dominated by machinery. His drawings are particularly well known for their impressive larger than life size, with some pieces measuring up to 18 feet long. His latest pieces, titled "Decrypted Savants" and "Oasis" will be revealed on July 31st at Mike Wright Gallery in Denver.

New york-based Dominican artist Samuel Gomez (first featured here) creates enormous detailed renderings with a steam-punk aesthetic. Using graphite and ink, Gomez’s work offers a glimpse into a mysterious dystopian society dominated by machinery. His drawings are particularly well known for their impressive larger than life size, with some pieces measuring up to 18 feet long. His latest pieces, titled “Decrypted Savants” and “Oasis” will be revealed on July 31st at Mike Wright Gallery in Denver. Measuring at 6×4 feet and 3×9 feet respectively, together the pieces envision our future as an industrial wasteland. In “Decrypted Savants,” a face can be made out of the machine’s intricate parts, as if it has taken on a life of its own. At the center of “Oasis” is a giant heart pumped by mechanical tubes, serving as a warning to control our industry before we succumb to it. Gomez says, “I question a world where all events and affairs seem systematic and guided, yet, without a clear compass on the horizon, it’s just chaos.” Go behind the scenes of his drawings in these photos of the artist at work, below.


“Decrypted Savants”


“Oasis”

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Randy Ortiz’s stirring drawings adorn gallery walls and album covers, each showing the artist’s knack for horror and surrealism. Works such as "Rejoice, for Tonight It Is a World That We Bury" (below) offer disconcerting narratives in progress, rendered in graphite.
"I think that there is a lot to point out, and to work against in daily life, particularly with respect to American culture," said Dane Patterson in an interview with Art Plural Gallery, where he had his last solo show in 2013. "We are creatures of habit and we can quickly fall into routine. We’re rarely aware of the way we compartmentalize everything in our lives, or have had things defined and compartmentalized for us." His graphite drawings begin as documentations of daily life — but they evolve into strange hybrids of images intended to stir up the ritualistic qualities of our mundane existence. Patterson works from photographs in a process he describes as sculptural. First, he stages a scene, shoots it, and then combine the resulting photographic image with other sourced material to create a meticulous, surreal pencil drawing on paper.
In her graphite drawings and paintings, Catriona Secker finds inspiration in biology textbooks and vintage natural history tomes. In the drawing above, in particular, the artist said she found inspiration in the reproductive system of a cockroach. Secker, whose work has been exhibited in Hong Kong, Australia, and beyond, is based in Sydney.
Austrian-born Stefan Zsaitsits creates intricately-detailed and deranged works with a sense of humor. Take for instance “Puppet,” an uncommon portrait of fairytale icon Pinocchio — half of his sweet face is scratched off with harsh dark lines. His wooden arm seems worn and his one bulging eye shows a mix of fear and sadness. Other anonymous figures seem to come from sort of equally distorted children’s tale. If you line up Zsaitsits’s quirky characters in a row — a little boy with a still-feathered chicken in mouth, a Magritte-like figure with no face except glasses and a floating ear — they look like clues to a larger narrative where it seems things went comically wrong. The artist’s paintings look more somber and eerie in contrast with many severed body parts and depressing scenes. No matter the medium, the artist creates intriguing scenes that entice the viewer even while threatening to turn them away with unsettling details.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List