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Photographs of Draped Unmasked Characters by German Artist Bartholot

German photographer Bartholot appreciates the unexplained. Bartholot is not looking to copy a kind of reality or life; his photos celebrate artificiality and design. His digital images merge his own sense of fashion with surrealism and usually start with a single thought or mood. They have been described as a combination of sculpture and photography, also reflecting his interest in colors and textures. For his latest collaboration with the Spanish creative studio Serial Cut, he created a series of photographs of draped unmasked characters.

German photographer Bartholot appreciates the unexplained. Bartholot is not looking to copy a kind of reality or life; his photos celebrate artificiality and design. His digital images merge his own sense of fashion with surrealism and usually start with a single thought or mood. They have been described as a combination of sculpture and photography, also reflecting his interest in colors and textures. For his latest collaboration with the Spanish creative studio Serial Cut, he created a series of photographs of draped unmasked characters. Titled, “Demiurges,” the series portrays three figures in colors black, gray and purple, holding bright yellow objects like basketballs and hairdryers, as if they were religious relics. They are inspired by beings responsible for the creation of the universe, as in Platic and Neoplatonic philosophy. “Demiurges” was commissioned by the studio Vasava for the annual festiva OFFF Fesvial Barcelona which took place last month, now appearing in the festival’s book. Take a look at more images from the series below.











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