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Meticulous and Extraordinary Paper Sculptures by Ann Hoi

Canada based, Macau born artist Ann Hoi breathes a sense of life in her meticulous and extraordinary paper sculptures. There are usually monochromatic, portraying mysterious hooded figures, young children in the company of bizarre creatures, and small deformed bodies, each as fanciful as they are unsettling. Since graduating from Ontario College of Art and Design University, Hoi has completed only a dozen works to date, owing to her detailed and painstaking process that begins digitally.

Canada based, Macau born artist Ann Hoi breathes a sense of life in her meticulous and extraordinary paper sculptures. There are usually monochromatic, portraying mysterious hooded figures, young children in the company of bizarre creatures, and small deformed bodies, each as fanciful as they are unsettling. Since graduating from Ontario College of Art and Design University, Hoi has completed only a dozen works to date, owing to her detailed and painstaking process that begins digitally. Each piece is first created using 3D animation software, from which paper molds are crafted. Her designs are then printed onto the paper, in arrangements that break up each figure like a sort of puzzle. She explains, “I decided to make sculptures in paper because it is something that is connected to my culture. I grew up watching people burn paper sculptures for spiritual reasons, as a ritual offering to the gods. We believe that what we burn here will be transferred to the afterlife. I was interested in the way we instill and impose these emotions and feelings onto an object that we have created, as if we instill life in the things we do.” Hoi is currently exhibiting in “Trace Element” at Galerie Ora-Ora in Hong Kong.

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