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Gianluca Traina’s “Portrait 360” Series Weaves Photos into Sculptures

Italian artist Gianluca Traina blurs the boundaries between photography and sculpture with his "Portrait 360" series. The artist shoots photos of anonymous subjects, zeroing in on their faces. Using a warp and weft technique (a method of weaving often used in traditional carpet-making), he weaves the 2D images into three-dimensional busts. The blurred, digitized photos become further distorted when Traina toys with their orientation, creating a continual interplay between the photographed and sculpted faces.

Italian artist Gianluca Traina blurs the boundaries between photography and sculpture with his “Portrait 360” series. The artist shoots photos of anonymous subjects, zeroing in on their faces. Using a warp and weft technique (a method of weaving often used in traditional carpet-making), he weaves the 2D images into three-dimensional busts. The blurred, digitized photos become further distorted when Traina toys with their orientation, creating a continual interplay between the photographed and sculpted faces.

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