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Neon Colors Exlode in Maya Hayuk’s New Mural in Toronto

Only a few days before opening her October 30 solo show at Cinders Gallery in New York, Maya Hayuk finished a mural in Toronto, her second large-scale intervention in Canada. The 300-foot-long piece is separated into 12 sections and the lengthy wall can be considered a permanent open-air exhibition with 12 individual works.

Only a few days before opening her October 30 solo show at Cinders Gallery in New York, Maya Hayuk finished a mural in Toronto, her second large-scale intervention in Canada. The 300-foot-long piece is separated into 12 sections and the lengthy wall can be considered a permanent open-air exhibition with 12 individual works.

Over the course of a week, the Brooklyn-based artist filled each portion of the wall with her signature symmetrical, colorful patterns. Using rollers and liters upon liters of paint, she created this series of large works inspired by traditional Ukrainian tapestries and knitting, as well as party and trance culture. Neon colors reappear in different parts, tying the sections together to create a single, unified piece. This mural was coordinated by Spectrum Art Projects, Cooper Cole Gallery, and partially funded by the City of Toronto’s StART Partnership program.

Images courtesy of the artist and Spectrum Art Projects.

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