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Sarah Anne Johnson’s Painted, Etched Erotic Photographs

Canadian photographer Sarah Anne Johnson captures impassioned moments, expressing the emotion behind them by painting and etching directly onto her prints. In her latest series, "Wanderlust," the artist captured sexual intimacy, photographing partners as well as individuals. Johnson's view of eroticism comes across subtly. None of her models appear to be performing for the camera. They seem so at ease that one begins to wonder how Johnson gained access into her subjects' most private experiences. The abstract embellishments she adds to her photos float like auras around the figures, as if the psychic connection between them has become tangible for us to witness.

Canadian photographer Sarah Anne Johnson captures impassioned moments, expressing the emotion behind them by painting and etching directly onto her prints. In her latest series, “Wanderlust,” the artist captured sexual intimacy, photographing partners as well as individuals. Johnson’s view of eroticism comes across subtly. None of her models appear to be performing for the camera. They seem so at ease that one begins to wonder how Johnson gained access into her subjects’ most private experiences. The abstract embellishments she adds to her photos float like auras around the figures, as if the psychic connection between them has become tangible for us to witness.

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