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Gabriel Isak’s Stylized, Enigmatic Photography

Swedish-born, San Francisco-based photographer Gabriel Isak shoots stylized photos filled with enigmatic symbolism and an enchanted ambiance. Solitary figures populate desolate nature scenes that seem to take place in the dead of winter. His color palette of black, grey, brown, and icy, cool blue underscores his work's dark mood. Take a look at some of his recent photos below.

Swedish-born, San Francisco-based photographer Gabriel Isak shoots stylized photos filled with enigmatic symbolism and an enchanted ambiance. Solitary figures populate desolate nature scenes that seem to take place in the dead of winter. His color palette of black, grey, brown, and icy, cool blue underscores his work’s dark mood. Take a look at some of his recent photos below.

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