Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Preview: Mako Miyamoto’s “Speculative Hunting”

People across the world have come forward with claims that they've found the fabled Yeti or Big Foot. Though the elusive creature remains in the wild, photographer Mako Miyamoto seems to have come close to capturing it with his latest solo show, "Speculative Hunting." In the humorous body of work, which debuts at Gauntlet Gallery in San Francisco on April 25, models clad in Wookiee masks from Star Wars invade everyday circumstances where they look bizarre and out of place. Through his cinematic staging, which includes underwater scenes and even stunts, Miyamoto invites drama and humor into his work.

People across the world have come forward with claims that they’ve found the fabled Yeti or Big Foot. Though the elusive creature remains in the wild, photographer Mako Miyamoto seems to have come close to capturing it with his latest solo show, “Speculative Hunting.” In the humorous body of work, which debuts at Gauntlet Gallery in San Francisco on April 25, models clad in Wookiee masks from Star Wars invade everyday circumstances where they look bizarre and out of place. Through his cinematic staging, which includes underwater scenes and even stunts, Miyamoto invites drama and humor into his work.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
As a kid, dropping your ice cream on the sidewalk was a moment of bitter disappointment. Michael Massaia makes us remember this childlike feeling of sadness with his photographs of melted ice cream — a feeling that you know is petty yet still breaks your heart. The artist simply places popsicles on black plexiglass and watches them melt over time. The original shape of a Spiderman or Spongebob pop turns into a swirling, oil slick-like pattern of pastel colors. The melted sweets evoke a nostalgic longing for carefree summers on the playground. Ice cream pops, something we hadn't previously given much thought to, turn out to be a pretty powerful sensory symbol.
Dutch artist Jasper de Beijer can be considered a historian of sorts, using sculpture-based photography to inspire new ideas about the past. The underlying theme in his work is the impact that the media's representation has on our collective understanding of history. de Beijer aims to deconstruct the media by staging historical events as 3D models, photographing them and then distorting them in his studio- the result of which looks stunningly more like drawings or illustrations than actual photographs. Each image taken is of a physical set made of drawn material and constructed bodies, environments, and ephemera.
Yoshimitsu Umekawa's photographs look like pictures of a pop-colored apocalypse. The forms in his images appear vibrant and swirling at first, but then evoke an underlying darkness. In the studio, Umekawa's process is similar to another photographer, Kim Keever, creating images inside of a fish tank and then coloring them digitally. His 'clouds' come in a variety of colors and iterations, and he has photographed 100 of them so far. He calls them "Incarnations"- visible parts of his experience as a young person living in Tokyo, with a nod to Japan's past which is no stranger to catastrophe.
Vilnius, Lithuania based photographer Ceslovas Cesnakevicius says that he first got into taking pictures for the purpose of creating his surrealistic photo-manipulations. A browse through his Facebook page will transport you into a dreamy other-world where magic is real; old-timey explorers ride hot air balloons made of puffy white clouds, while men in top hats enjoy a sunny afternoon snooze in paper sail boats. His latest series titled "The Zoo" imagines what it would be like if we shared our every day world with wild animals in whimsical black and white images.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List