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Preview: “Gathering Whispers” by Edwin Ushiro at Giant Robot GR2

Los Angeles based artist Edwin Ushiro (featured here) was raised in Maui and we get to relive his tropical childhood in his upcoming solo show “Gathering Whispers”. Opening July 12th at Giant Robot’s GR2 gallery, Ushiro’s new show is a ‘gathering’ of memories that feel familiar even if you didn’t grow up in Hawaii. His dreamy images capture tiny scenes taking place in overwhelming landscapes. Sometimes, they are split in half and a little wavy, as if we’re peering through a fractured mirror. Get a preview courtesy of the artist after the jump.

Los Angeles based artist Edwin Ushiro (featured here) was raised in Maui and we get to relive his tropical childhood in his upcoming solo show “Gathering Whispers”. Opening July 12th at Giant Robot’s GR2 gallery, Ushiro’s new show is a ‘gathering’ of memories that feel familiar even if you didn’t grow up in Hawaii. His dreamy images capture tiny scenes taking place in overwhelming landscapes. Sometimes, they are split in half and a little wavy, as if we’re peering through a fractured mirror. It’s a meticulous process that begins with drawings which are manipulated digitally, and then hand painted. Ushiro’s titles are equally curious. In “Where No One Remains Alone to Fend for Themselves”, kids light sparklers under a looming, gloomy overpass. Their dancing might imply a celebration, but the sparklers are supposed to chase off evil spirits. Such simple experiences had a lasting effect on Ushiro who employs ghost stories in his painting. Portraits like “Dreaming of You Yesterday Dreaming of Tomorrow” get up close and personal and show off Ushiro’s color skills. “Gathering Whispers” looks like an exhibition where Ushiro will open up in new ways both personally and creatively.


“Where No One Remains Alone to Fend for Themselves” (detail)

Process work:

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