Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Alice Wellinger Tells Her Story in Ironic Illustrations

Austrian illustrator Alice Wellinger paints ironic and surreal images inspired by her childhood and everyday life experiences as a woman. Wellinger's paintings are a like patchwork of womanhood, often weaving female bodies with florals and other abstract, organic shapes. Her editorial illustration employs elements of cool surrealism with unapologetic messaging; from a fragile, porcelain-like vagina to more whimsical, like her pregnant Superwoman on a mission. Her imagination runs wild in her personal work. Wellinger’s artist statement on her website is simple: “I always try to tell a little story in my pictures - I like when people have something to think about." See more after the jump!

Austrian illustrator Alice Wellinger paints ironic and surreal images inspired by her childhood and everyday life experiences as a woman. Wellinger’s paintings are a like patchwork of womanhood, often weaving female bodies with florals and other abstract, organic shapes. Her editorial illustration employs elements of cool surrealism with unapologetic messaging; from a fragile, porcelain-like vagina to more whimsical, like her pregnant Superwoman on a mission. Her imagination runs wild in her personal work. Wellinger’s artist statement on her website is simple: “I always try to tell a little story in my pictures – I like when people have something to think about.”

One might compare her to surrealists like Salvador Dali, 1930s figurative artists and modern illustrators like Mary GrandPré, but the truth is, Wellinger’s influence is eclectic. The root of language, elegant grace of a greyhound’s body, to contemporary found object art are just a few specific examples. Throughout her career, Wellinger has undergone many artistic changes in her expressive visual form. Her concerns for light, color, drawing, and design come together in evocative paintings that continue to evolve. Take a look at some of Wellinger’s recent work below.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Christian Russo crafts illustrations that seem to both utilize and parody elements from popular culture. The Chicago-based artist blends multiple approaches to each aspect of a work, showing an ability in emulating tattoo art, comic characters, realism, and other styles.
Kristen Egan's work, packed with notes of mythology and folk art, is featured in a new show at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia. “Still Coming Ashore” features the whimsical sculptures of the artist, who also co-owns the archery gear/fine arts business Egan & Ives.
Mark Gmehling's 3D-rendered creations are instantly recognizable for their playful textures: rubbery legs that weave and stretch; gummy bodies that bounce off the floor; goo that drips and metal that glimmers. The artist (see our extensive interview in our current issue, Hi-Fructose Vol. 32) began as an analog illustrator and even cites graffiti as an early influence. These days, his digital illustrations lay the groundwork for prints, murals and sculptures. Gmehling has an exhibition titled "Plastic" opening tonight at RWE in his hometown of Dortmund, Germany filled with satirical, off-kilter pieces.
Last November, San Francisco based illustrator Jeremy Fish (covered here) suffered from a brain aneurism that changed his life and approach to artmaking. The twenty works featured in his exhibition "Anger Management" at Black Book Gallery in Denver were created between surgeries to treat his condition. Fish has had to seek new ways to reduce stress, including visiting an anger management specialist, inspiring the series' title. In new ink, acrylic on wood, and custom skate deck pieces, Fish draws his cute and creepy animals like owls, beavers, jackalopes, and candy skulls with brainy motifs.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List