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Brian Blomerth Depicts First-Ever Acid Trip in ‘Bicycle Day’

In Brian Blomerth's recently released book, "Bicycle Day," the illustrator chronicles the first-ever ingestion of LSD by Swiss chemist Albert Hofmann. The tale combines a loyal account of the 1943 acid trip with Blomerth's beloved style, which has been featured in previous comics and zines—as well as album covers and other outlets.

In Brian Blomerth’s recently released book, “Bicycle Day,” the illustrator chronicles the first-ever ingestion of LSD by Swiss chemist Albert Hofmann. The tale combines a loyal account of the 1943 acid trip with Blomerth’s beloved style, which has been featured in previous comics and zines—as well as album covers and other outlets.

Anthology Editions, the book’s publisher, says, “Combining an extraordinary true story told in journalistic detail with the artist’s gritty, timelessly Technicolor comix style, Brian Blomerth’s Bicycle Day is a testament to mind expansion and a stunningly original visual history.” The book features a forward by famed ethnopharmacologist Dennis McKenna.

See more of the book below, and find the publisher’s site here.

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