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Caleb Weintraub’s Dystopian Digital Artworks and Paintings

Caleb Weintraub confronts his audience with an alternative, morally-stripped and intense digital fantasy world where children hold guns on each other around misplaced, irresponsible adult figures. "I make paintings of a disintegrating world where humanity has gone awry," Weintraub said of his work in a previous interview. In a sense, he works in parallels to the present state of children's overstimulation and desensitization in a controlled atmosphere. The bright colors and video game-like renderings complicate the readings of his work, however. The viewer may find himself questioning the relationship between his techniques and conceptual leanings. Weintraub is choosing to create, at first glance, friendly cartoon narratives with dark content below the surface.

Caleb Weintraub confronts his audience with an alternative, morally-stripped and intense digital fantasy world where children hold guns on each other around misplaced, irresponsible adult figures. “I make paintings of a disintegrating world where humanity has gone awry,” Weintraub said of his work in a previous interview. In a sense, he works in parallels to the present state of children’s overstimulation and desensitization in a controlled atmosphere. The bright colors and video game-like renderings complicate the readings of his work, however. The viewer may find himself questioning the relationship between his techniques and conceptual leanings. Weintraub is choosing to create, at first glance, friendly cartoon narratives with dark content below the surface.

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