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Dmitry Kawarga’s ‘Anthropocentrism Toxicosis’ Installation Series

In his first exhibition in Hungary, Dmitry Kawarga's "post-human" sculptures and installations reflect on humanity's vulnerability. His "Anthropocentrism Toxicosis” series, in particular, is on display at the Ferenczy Museum, with works built with polymers and occasionally, usage of 3D-printing processes. The exhibition runs through Sept. 15.

In his first exhibition in Hungary, Dmitry Kawarga’s “post-human” sculptures and installations reflect on humanity’s vulnerability. His “Anthropocentrism Toxicosis” series, in particular, is on display at the Ferenczy Museum, with works built with polymers and occasionally, usage of 3D-printing processes. The exhibition runs through Sept. 15.

“In Kawarga’s view, humanity will soon disown its biological self, and separate from its physical body,” the venue says. “However, in addition to looking at how things human and non-human are related, and using the opposition of organic nature and geometric technology to reveal how the population changes, this special artistic project shows these changes, above all, in the crisis of anthropocentrism, which posits man as the centre and ultimate cause of the world. Objects are presented in Plexiglas cylinders, compacted in prisms, and sometimes on their own: discarded things that have survived their own worlds, flowing over and covering a postapocalyptic wasteland.”

Read more on the venue’s site here, and find more from the artist here.

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