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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

David Spriggs’s Optical Installations Create 3D Illusions

David Spriggs uses a combinations of acrylic paint and transparent plastic sheets to create sculptural installations with images floating within them. Spriggs divides his abstract designs into layers and paints them one by one until they accumulate into an illusory final product. His work focuses on radiating patterns that evoke various cosmic phenomena. With his strategic use of lighting, the nebulas come to life and appear to levitate before the viewer.

David Spriggs uses a combinations of acrylic paint and transparent plastic sheets to create sculptural installations with images floating within them. Spriggs divides his abstract designs into layers and paints them one by one until they accumulate into an illusory final product. His work focuses on radiating patterns that evoke various cosmic phenomena. With his strategic use of lighting, the nebulas come to life and appear to levitate before the viewer.

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