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The Mixed-Media Surrealism of Murielle Belin

Murielle Belin’s dark-surrealist polyptychs are striking blends of oil painting, sculpture, woodworking, and other disciplines. "Calendrier Perpetual," in particular, shows the artist's abilities in taxidermy and building, with different corners of the piece offering surprises.

Murielle Belin’s dark-surrealist polyptychs are striking blends of oil painting, sculpture, woodworking, and other disciplines. “Calendrier Perpetual,” in particular, shows the artist’s abilities in taxidermy and building, with different corners of the piece offering surprises.

“Her dark and highly sensitive universe is mainly inspired by ancient iconography (anatomy paintings, ancient and modern bestiaries, religious or scientific prints),” her site says. “She is particularly fond of classic art techniques such as oil painting on wood, clay or engraving, and fringe techniques such as taxidermy and quilling. Somewhere between singular, visionary or surrealistic art, the artefacts originating from Murielle Belin’s workshop are patiently and meticulously designed. They are the product of a spontaneous and instinctive blend of skilful art and popular imagery, revealing a tinge of cynicism and humor behind the gloomy landscapes and tormented characters.”

See more of her work on her site.


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