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The Color Experimentations of Aches

Using sub-pixel techniques and additive color theory, Aches creates murals and portraits that reflect today’s digital world with analogue spraypaint and acrylics. The Irish artist, whose work has been seen in Spain, Denmark, England, Switzerland, the U.S., and beyond, applies this experimentation to large figurative works, gallery portraits, and traditional graffiti text.

Using sub-pixel techniques and additive color theory, Aches creates murals and portraits that reflect today’s digital world with analogue spraypaint and acrylics. The Irish artist, whose work has been seen in Spain, Denmark, England, Switzerland, the U.S., and beyond, applies this experimentation to large figurative works, gallery portraits, and traditional graffiti text.

“The RGB palette is specifically selected to emanate the colours that we see most often – the colours on screen that create the digital representations of our friends,” the gallery Atelier Maser says on his portrait practice. “Hand mixing every colour to correlate to the onscreen pixel tones, Aches has created abstract representations of faces familiar to him – with intricate detail and many, many layers of paint (spray and acrylic). Up-close the work can be viewed as woven web of colour overlays, but from a distance – the portraits emerge. This allows the viewer to have multiple experiences of the same painting, which is paralleled with the idea of interacting with the many digital aliases of the same person.”

Find more on the artist’s Instagram.


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