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Johnston Foster’s Sculptural Assemblages Featured in ‘Bone Pendulum in Motley’

With "Bone Pendulum in Motley" at Freight+Volume Gallery, Johnston Foster offers new, wild assemblages made from metal hardware, textiles and plastics, PVC, yoga mats, electrical wires, and other materials typically reserved for home renovation projects. Kicking off tomorrow and running through Nov. 10 at the gallery, several new pieces are included in the show.

With “Bone Pendulum in Motley” at Freight+Volume Gallery, Johnston Foster offers new, wild assemblages made from metal hardware, textiles and plastics, PVC, yoga mats, electrical wires, and other materials typically reserved for home renovation projects. Kicking off tomorrow and running through Nov. 10 at the gallery, several new pieces are included in the show.

“Likening his artistic process to a sort of ‘homegrown alchemy,’ Foster works from intuition, allowing spontaneity and the constraints of his scavenged materials to guide him, rather than preconceived conceptual frameworks,” the gallery says. “Foster’s work is intensely evocative, and often manifests a riddle-like quality, evident in Valley of the Universe, one of the three sculptures of solitary human skulls on display. Nested within its hollowed-out cranium is a verdant oasis, replete with trees formed from cut yoga mats and a waterfall of poured glue, a microcosmic environment that suggests the duality of life and death as well as humanity’s transience in the face of the eternal cycles of nature.”

See more from the artist on Foster’s site and the gallery’s page.

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