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The Gouache-and-Ink Paintings of Edie Fake

Edie Fake’s gouache-and-ink paintings explore issues of identity and sexuality through architectural and at first, seemingly abstract elements. The cascading geometric elements may recall the broader work of Maya Hayuk, yet Fake’s work is deceptively hyper-personal in nature.

Edie Fake’s gouache-and-ink paintings explore issues of identity and sexuality through architectural and at first, seemingly abstract elements. The cascading geometric elements may recall the broader work of Maya Hayuk, yet Fake’s work is deceptively hyper-personal in nature.

“Edie Fake’s paintings start as self-portraits, and from there, they make a break for it, referencing elements of the trans and non-binary body through pattern, color and architectural metaphor,” Western Exhibitions says. “His precise, intimately scaled, gouache-and-ink paintings on panel are structured around the physical aspects of transition and adaptation as well as mental and sexual health.”

See more of Fake’s work below.

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