Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Daniel Arsham’s Stunning, New ‘Architectural Interventions’

Artist and designer Daniel Arsham currently has his first show in Russia at Moscow with “Moving Architecture” at VHDNKh. His nine site-specific "architectural interventions" bring surreal, three-dimensional touches to otherwise nondescript spaces. The photographs showing Arsham's work in this piece were taken by James Law. Arsham was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.


Artist and designer Daniel Arsham currently has his first show in Russia at Moscow with “Moving Architecture” at VHDNKh. His nine site-specific “architectural interventions” bring surreal, three-dimensional touches to otherwise nondescript spaces. The photographs showing Arsham’s work in this piece were taken by James Law. Arsham was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

“Spatial manipulation through the destruction of existent forms is a prevalent theme throughout Arsham’s work,” a statement says. “The exhibition in Moscow will feature the artist’s large-scale installation Excavated Walls, involving a huge concrete tunnel with abstract perforations melting into a real life-size human silhouette. The elements used in the installation reflect the author’s vision of human-to-architecture interaction, of man’s capacity to create, destroy, and modernize constructions as well as natural materials.”


Arsham also has shows running in New York, Rio de Janeiro, and Paris right now. The exhibition runs through Jan. 8 at the space. See more photos of the work below.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Nicki Crock is a conceptual artist currently working in Columbus, Ohio, but her head is in the clouds. Her installation series "Dream House" transforms space into an ethereal, geometric floating dreamscape made out of white paper. "A dream house is something to aspire to and long for," she says. "What better form could a daydream take shape in, than with something that we, as humans, already use to fulfill our imaginations: clouds."
Sam Jinks's sculptures (featured in HF Vol. 27) are eerily realistic. Using resin, silicone, pigment, and human hair, the Australian artist builds uncanny human likenesses with all their imperfections laid bare. Jinks's work is highly detailed and includes elements like chipped fingernails, wrinkles, and protruding bones. His protagonists, many of whom have an emaciated appearance, appear to have survived many trials and tribulations. Though Jinks doesn't present us with a narrative to parse through, his characters' nude bodies are like roadmaps to their life journeys. The artist has a solo show coming up at Mark Straus Gallery in New York on March 29 featuring new and archival work. Check out a preview below.
The dark surrealist sculptures and paintings of Jeremy Cross return in a new show at Dark Art Emporium, titled "Speaking In Ghosts." Kicking off Saturday at the gallery, the recent works by the artist include his “Ghost Skull” series of busts.
Kim Yun Soo is a Korean multi media artist whose work spans from mixed media sculpture and installations to photography, but perhaps her most compelling work is an ongoing series of PVC footprints, dramatically transformed into surreal mountainscapes. Since 1999, Soo has been collecting the fingerprints and footprints of her close friends and acquaintances, recording their unique shapes and spirals and giving them a new dimension inspired by the natural world. Many of her works resemble a wave, where a single footprint ripples out into stacked shapes and contours, forming a sort of topographical map of their owner that she arranges in simple displays.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List