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The Hyperrealistic Sculptures of Marc Sijan

Marc Sijan's hyperrealistic figurative sculptures are both unsettling and vulnerable. The artist often depicts everyday people, from blue-collar workers and public servants to characters in their most vulnerable moments. And at times, works like "Birth" take on a more conceptual role.

Marc Sijan‘s hyperrealistic figurative sculptures are both unsettling and vulnerable. The artist often depicts everyday people, from blue-collar workers and public servants to characters in their most vulnerable moments. And at times, works like “Birth” take on a more conceptual role.

Opera Gallery offers some insight into the artist’s process: “His meticulous creative process begins with the construction of a plaster mould from a live model,” it says. “He then uses a magnifying glass to sculpt the interior of the mould in order to assure that each detail is accurate, before casting the figure in resin. Realistic flesh tones are then achieved with multiple layers of oil paint and varnish, a process that takes around six months to complete. His sculptures are so life-like as to almost be on the verge of movement. He mostly depicts people that are often overlooked by our society such as blue collared workers or cleaning staff, turning the ordinary into extraordinary works of art.”

See more of his work below.


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