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Gabriel Barredo’s Absorbing Mixed-Media Sculptures

Gabriel Barredo’s meticulous mixed-media sculptures and installations are made using found objects. The artist’s pieces are at times created to move, their writhing interworkings appearing both organic and mechanical in nature. Works like "Madamadam" (top), startle even in their stillness.

Gabriel Barredo’s meticulous mixed-media sculptures and installations are made using found objects. The artist’s pieces are at times created to move, their writhing interworkings appearing both organic and mechanical in nature. Works like “Madamadam” (top), startle even in their stillness.

“[Barredo’s] work is meant to create entire opuses. He builds them through months of bricolage, sketching and painting, elevating his sculptures to nearly theatrical lengths, immersive for the viewer, featuring numerous pieces both large and small, some of them simple drawings, others motorised, along with object-led side-narratives—with all of it accompanied by sound and light. The highly reclusive artist has pioneered kinetic sculpture in the Philippines and his work is included in many important collections.”

See more of his work below.

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