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Jeff Gillette Returns With ‘Worst Case Scenario’

Jeff Gillette’s paintings juxtapose the ruinous landscapes of shanty towns with the flourishes of Disney theme parks. In a new show at Copro Gallery, titled "Worst Case Scenario," the artist's latest explorations are shown. The show runs through July 7 at the Santa Monica space. Gillette was last featured on HiFructose.com here.


Jeff Gillette’s paintings juxtapose the ruinous landscapes of shanty towns with the flourishes of Disney theme parks. In a new show at Copro Gallery, titled “Worst Case Scenario,” the artist’s latest explorations are shown. The show runs through July 7 at the Santa Monica space. Gillette was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

“Most of Jeff’s paintings feature Disney characters either prominently, hidden or dead in the piles of debris,” a statement says. “Also Included in the show are a multitude of sculptures that mimic the detritus that is the material used by the slum inhabitants to create their impromptu homes. In one painting he portrays the litter-strewn mud banks of the horribly polluted shoreline of Mumbai, India, in a whole new light.”


See more work from the shoe below.

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