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The Intimate, Strange Paintings of Scott G. Brooks

The vulnerable, fantastical oil paintings of Scott G. Brooks offer both narratives and raw portraiture. Though the artist has a knack for large-scale, intricate scenes, he can pack immense power in his single-character works. Brooks was last featured on our website here. In a statement, the artist talks about where his paintings come from.

The vulnerable, fantastical oil paintings of Scott G. Brooks offer both narratives and raw portraiture. Though the artist has a knack for large-scale, intricate scenes, he can pack immense power in his single-character works. Brooks was last featured on our website here. In a statement, the artist talks about where his paintings come from:

“My work starts with a desire, and ability, to paint,” he says. “It comes from an attempt to be part of history, and achieve immortality. It comes from stubbornness and refusing to give up. My work must be personal and private to succeed, so it’s about exposing myself. There are risks and resistance on my part. Technically, the challenge is to create light, volume, and texture. Art is a reflection of our time and today, in the midst of the digital revolution, our perception is changing as well. The development of CGI, and its ability to synthesise ‘life’ has forced me to look deeper into how I use paint to represent ‘life.’”

See more of his work below.

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