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Hitomi Hosono’s Foliage-Inspired Ceramic Vessels

Ceramicist Hitomi Hosono creates vessels born from several, leaf- and flower-like forms. These porcelain pieces carry the rich textures and shapes of their inspiration, even in their interiors. The artist cites both the traditions of Europe and Japan in her approach. Based in the U.K., the artist studied in Japan and Denmark before moving her practice.

Ceramicist Hitomi Hosono creates vessels born from several, leaf- and flower-like forms. These porcelain pieces carry the rich textures and shapes of their inspiration, even in their interiors. The artist cites both the traditions of Europe and Japan in her approach. Based in the U.K., the artist studied in Japan and Denmark before moving her practice.


Using her delicate process, a given piece can take up to 18 months to complete. “The subjects of my current porcelain work are shapes inspired by leaves and flowers,” Hosono says. “I study botanical forms in the garden. I find myself drawn to the intricacy of plants, examining the veins of a leaf, how its edges are shaped, the layering of a flower’s petals. I look, I touch, I draw.”

See more work from the artist below.

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