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Andrew Schoultz’s New Works Navigate Realities, Political Discourse

Andrew Schoultz’s mixed-media explorations of political discourse, cyberspace, and reality itself is part of an exhibition closing these weekend at Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco. According to a statement, his new body of work "questions the meaning and function of public space and the nature of political discourse.” He uses illusive techniques to put forth this dialogue, blending abstraction, strange creatures, and converging universes to navigate it. He was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here. Schoultz also appeared in Hi-Fructose Vol. 42.

Andrew Schoultz’s mixed-media explorations of political discourse, cyberspace, and reality itself is part of an exhibition closing these weekend at Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco. According to a statement, his new body of work “questions the meaning and function of public space and the nature of political discourse.” He uses illusive techniques to put forth this dialogue, blending abstraction, strange creatures, and converging universes to navigate it. He was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here. Schoultz also appeared in Hi-Fructose Vol. 42.

According “In the age of Trump, truth is a questionable commodity, peddled like a trinket for short-term gain,” a statement says. “Is this really a new phenomenon, or simply one that has emerged brazenly from the shadows, to operate with impunity in the full light of day? Schoultz’s work situates itself squarely within current socio-political concerns, illuminating the battleground of a sharply divided country.”

See more work from the show below.

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