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Teng-Yuan Chang’s Explorations of a Future Earth

In Teng-Yuan Chang’s acrylic paintings, his parrot scientist characters explore a future form of our planet that’s been ravaged and transformed. The varying textures and approaches the artist implements offers a world touched and altered by many hands. And through the perspective of his observers, we too wonder what happened to this Earth since our own involvement.

In Teng-Yuan Chang’s acrylic paintings, his parrot scientist characters explore a future form of our planet that’s been ravaged and transformed. The varying textures and approaches the artist implements offers a world touched and altered by many hands. And through the perspective of his observers, we too wonder what happened to this Earth since our own involvement.

“Compared to the elapsed time, Chang focuses more on the future,” a recent statement says. “Though targeting Parrot Man as the protagonist, in the recent two years, Chang’s interest for the future world has gradually taken up the canvas. Arising from the premise of retrospecting the contemporary and imagining technology, Chang expands boundaries of his fantasy world to the approaching future, accordingly posing queries through composition of amusing elements.”

See more of his recent work below.

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