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Eduardo Naranjo’s Haunting Oil Paintings

Eduardo Naranjo (born in 1944) has enjoyed a decades-long career as a painter. Influenced by the Cubists and Surrealists of his native Spain, in the 1970s he evolved his style from abstract expressionism to the surreal, figurative oil paintings he creates today. The artist's works are tightly controlled and vivid. He often plays with translucent figures, layering images like strange memories intermingling inside of a dream. There's something photographic about Naranjo's work, not only in his realist approach to figuration but in the frayed edges and paper-like textures he renders, evoking old, found photographs.

Eduardo Naranjo (born in 1944) has enjoyed a decades-long career as a painter. Influenced by the Cubists and Surrealists of his native Spain, in the 1970s he evolved his style from abstract expressionism to the surreal, figurative oil paintings he creates today. The artist’s works are tightly controlled and vivid. He often plays with translucent figures, layering images like strange memories intermingling inside of a dream. There’s something photographic about Naranjo’s work, not only in his realist approach to figuration but in the frayed edges and paper-like textures he renders, evoking old, found photographs.

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