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Nadezda’s New Series Features Haunting Meditations on Femininity

Nadezda’s haunting oil paintings are studies in both order and chaos, as the artist’s fluid renderings blend intricate and abstract embellishments. A new show at Haven Gallery in Long Island, titled “Fly-By-Night,” meditates on femininity in this style. The show starts June 1 and lasts through June 18.

Nadezda’s haunting oil paintings are studies in both order and chaos, as the artist’s fluid renderings blend intricate and abstract embellishments. A new show at Haven Gallery in Long Island, titled “Fly-By-Night,” meditates on femininity in this style. The show starts June 1 and lasts through June 18.

“‘Fly-By-Night,’ which means either a creature that only flies at night (nocturnal creature) or a person who appears and disappears rapidly, or gives an impression of transience. The earliest use of the phrase is said to have been a reproach for women, signifying that she was a witch. I thought it fits perfectly with a darker female vibe of the paintings for this feature.”

The Russia-born painter and photographer currently resides in California. Outside of her personal work, she’s worked in film, theatre, and other arenas. Her costume and character designs have been seen in film series like “X-Men,” “Pirates of the Caribbean,” and others. Lately, her film work has included “Kong: Skull Island,” “The Mummy,” “Alien: Covenant,” and “The Dark Tower.”

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