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Stefan Glerum’s Retrofuturistic Illustrations

Amsterdam-based artist Stefan Glerum creates retrofuturistic illustrations, in a distinctively clear yet vibrant style. At times, these worlds appear closer to our own than we would want them to, depicting obsessions with technology and a desperation that recalls the speculative sci-fi of yesterday. This style lends itself to the artist’s commercial work, in which the artist’s work is distinguished in its off-kilter take on a variety of topics.

Amsterdam-based artist Stefan Glerum creates retrofuturistic illustrations, in a distinctively clear yet vibrant style. At times, these worlds appear closer to our own than we would want them to, depicting obsessions with technology and a desperation that recalls the speculative sci-fi of yesterday. This style lends itself to the artist’s commercial work, in which the artist’s work is distinguished in its off-kilter take on a variety of topics.


“Stefan Glerum’s style is like a melting pot of illustration heritage,” the artist says, in a statement. “While its subconscious familiarity has universal appeal, his work is also a study point for those with knowledge of graphic design history. His work is inspired by early 20th Century movements such as Art Deco, Bauhaus, Italian Futurism and Russian Constructivism, which he combines with popular themes, executed in a handdrawn style reminiscent of the clear line.”

Glerum’s list of clients includes Netflix, Obey Clothing, Adidas, Wired, National Opera of Munich, Concertgebouw Amsterdam, Dekmantel, Paradiso, Dutch Ministry of Social Affairs, and a slew of other varied products. After studying illustration at Academy St. Joost, Glerum worked as an assistant to Joost Swarte, the comic artist known for Katoen en Pinbal, Jopo de Pojo, Anton Makassar, Dr Ben Cine, and other titles.

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