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Alex Garant Brings ‘Viscera’ to Arch Enemy Arts

Oil painter Alex Garant, also known as “Queen of Double Eyes,” brings a new collection of works to Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia. “Viscera,” which kicks off Friday (Jan. 6) and runs through Jan. 28, features four new paintings and three ink studies. The ink works are intended to represent a broader trinity of life: mother, daughter, and spirit. Garant was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

Oil painter Alex Garant, also known as “Queen of Double Eyes,” brings a new collection of works to Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia. “Viscera,” which kicks off Friday (Jan. 6) and runs through Jan. 28, features four new paintings and three ink studies. The ink works are intended to represent a broader trinity of life: mother, daughter, and spirit. Garant was last featured on HiFructose.com here.


The gallery describes the new show as “featuring Alex Garant’s signature style of element duplication and super-positioned portraits, this series is meant to be intuitive, a step into refinement, and a far abstraction of human biological elements: blood, tears, flesh.”


This disorienting, yet engrossing style evolves in this show, with the artist’s gift for color coming through in works like “Red Cell” (top), with its strikes of color pushing through red hues. These vibrate even more than previous pieces with circular extractions, scattered across the canvas. The effect takes on a different role in the ink studies, altering the existing forms.





After studying visual arts at Quebec’s Notre-Dame–De-Foy College, the artist found a home in Toronto. Since, her work has appeared in galleries across the world, from New York and Los Angeles to Portugal and Australia.

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