Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Mothmeister’s Unsettling, Remote Portraits of the Grotesque

“Mothmeister” is the moniker of the duo behind surreal, fantastical, and unsettling portraits of lonesome clowns and other creatures across varying backdrops. They call their fictional universe Wounderland, a place where the Instagram culture is reflected in drab, masked figures often accompanied by stuffed and mounted animals, a product of the two's fascination pf and collecting habits in taxidermy.

“Mothmeister” is the moniker of the duo behind surreal, fantastical, and unsettling portraits of lonesome clowns and other creatures across varying backdrops. They call their fictional universe Wounderland, a place where the Instagram culture is reflected in drab, masked figures often accompanied by stuffed and mounted animals, a product of the two’s fascination pf and collecting habits in taxidermy.

Nearly 200 Wounderland portraits are currently for sale on the Mothmeister’s Etsy page. The Belgian pair have been collecting the pieces, masks, and costumes used in their photos for more than two decades. The couple often opts for remote locations, sometimes taking hours to travel to destinations. “Wounderland is a no man’s land, far away from ugly concrete cities and their stressed-out human inhabitants,” they told 7Q Interview. “We prefer to shoot in barren landscapes, without any voyeurs around. We travel to remote sceneries on foot, packed like mules with all our costumes, taxidermy, and equipment.”



This very quality seems to defy a culture of those who feel the need to capture hundreds of selfies throughout their weeks, with backgrounds that offer symbols of status to those who follow. There’s also a Victorian edge to the images, adding to the eeriness of each lonely portrait.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Kiev-based photographer Oleg Oprisco's works modify small details in their real-world settings to convey the essence of fantasy. It is as if his photos give off the fresh, dewy aroma of a wild escape to a desolate countryside that seems to belong to no specific time or place. In one piece, a girl holds up a rolled-up piece of a grassy lawn. Though anyone could do this in real life, in the photograph she seems to wield a sort of power over the land with her powerful, summoning gaze. In another, a model holds a stained umbrella that briefly gives the impression of a multi-colored rain shower before Oprisco's process of dousing the set in paint gives itself away. These small details invite viewers to indulge Oprisco's innocent, storybook-like fantasies.
Antony Crossfield, an artist based in London, manipulates his photographs to create new ways of looking at our natural forms. Series like “Second Skin” take the outer shell of the human body and pushes it outside of the boundaries of superficiality. It’s in these exercises that Crossfield aims to “to present the body not as a protective envelope that defines and unifies our limits, but as an organ of physical and psychical interchange between bodies.”
South African designer Justin Plunkett’s “Con/struct” series has more in common with the digitally-fabricated renderings of speculative architecture than documentary photography, but it illustrates an eerie collision of both formats. The images are built from a combination of photography, 3D modeling and substantial post-production editing, to form street-level perspectives of futuristic urban fantasies.
Nicola Yeoman creates cryptic installations by altering and rearranging mundane objects. Often installed in abandoned buildings or outdoors, her ephemeral works live on in the form of photographs that become works of art in their own right. Many of Yeoman's pieces explore typography. In one, she piled and hung wooden chairs in two sections of a room. Viewed from a specific angle, the chaotic arrangement of furniture forms the letter "D" with its negative space.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List