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Justyna Kisielewicz’s Satirical, Vibrant Oil Paintings

During her schooling at the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw, Polish painter Justyna Kisielewicz was forced to create monochromatic paintings. But after she graduated, she took things in a new direction. Much of her work, primarily her oil paintings, are lush explosions of pink and pop. Now, she’s been dubbed the “princess of pop culture” by Pangea Magazine, who says the artist's intention is to "intention is to rip up the stereotypical image of the dour Polish artist."

During her schooling at the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw, Polish painter Justyna Kisielewicz was forced to create monochromatic paintings. But after she graduated, she took things in a new direction. Much of her work, primarily her oil paintings, are lush explosions of pink and pop. Now, she’s been dubbed the “princess of pop culture” by Pangea Magazine, who says the artist’s intention is to “intention is to rip up the stereotypical image of the dour Polish artist.”

Kisielewicz’s paintings carry an explosive helping of pop culture and seemingly light fare, adorned with Disney iconography and desserts. Though with works adorned with words like “WANT” and “BOLD,” viewers see the satirical, if not darker edge to the artist’s output. Her work has also garnered attention from magazines like Elle, Harper’s, Bazaar, and Glamour, as her work has been recreated in the fashion world.

The artist takes part in an show in January at 111 Minna Gallery in San Francisco, titled Alone Together. The bill includes Kisielewicz, Emily Burns, and Melissa Arendt. The gallery describes the show as “colorful, sensual, ironic, dreamy, challenging, thankful, arresting, daring, and so much more.”

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