Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Oil Paintings of Kei Imazu Recontextualize Art History

The oil paintings of Kei Imazu appear as a convergence of art history and cultures, surreal collisions reminiscent of a digital glitch. Her works begin as collages, sourced from the Internet or analog media, before being even further recontextualized as a singular painting. The result is something that feels separate from any one era, wholly fresh yet familiar.

The oil paintings of Kei Imazu appear as a convergence of art history and cultures, surreal collisions reminiscent of a digital glitch. Her works begin as collages, sourced from the Internet or analog media, before being even further recontextualized as a singular painting. The result is something that feels separate from any one era, wholly fresh yet familiar.

The gallery Azito adds this, on her process: “After making a collage, she transforms it from her own point of view. Some sceneries are like melted while the others are like collapsed. For Imazu, the meaning that the motif contains is not important in the end. Moreover, she enjoys the colors and shapes of the motifs. She shifts our view to see all objects’ aesthetics and the entire composition.”

The artist currently lives and works in Tokyo, where she participates in both solo and group exhibitions. See more of her work below.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Sergio Martinez’s oil paintings teem with movement, athleticism, and drama. The artist, born in Chile in the the mid-1960s, works in “descriptive realism.” The result of his gravitation toward cabaret and circus life translates to work full of danger and grace. A biography offers insights on Sergio’s current path.
John Jacobsmeyer’s oil paintings on aluminum recall nostalgic and imaginative experience, using wooden backdrops and technology-inspired shapes. These works at once feel aged and modern, and while humor runs throughout his recent works, several ring of sincerity and vulnerability. And a few others have skeleton warriors. Jacobsmeyer has cited Gene Roddenberry, Nietzsche, David Lynch, and Mary Shelley as influences.
New York City-based artist Julie Heffernan crafts oil paintings on canvas that depict lush backdrops and occasionally, injects the artist herself into fantastical narratives and allegories. However, much of the recent work shown here pulls the camera back for a holistic view into fictional worlds. The artist last appeared on HiFructose.com here.
Syd Bee is a Seattle-based painter that creates figurative paintings that often appear to exist in a dreamlike state. Working in oils, the artist employs a technique of creating a pastel-hued glow around her subjects. Bee enjoys the way the soft outer edges of the paintings feel optically; which enhances the mysterious effect produced by her oil paintings. Check out our interview with the artist after the jump, as she discusses her new work.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List