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Renaud Delorme’s Unconventional Portraits of Modern Day Celebrities

French artist Renaud Delorme's portraits lie somewhere between Pop Art, computer graphics and recycling. His mosaic-like images are made using an array of unconventional materials and found objects that he collects; everything from fabric, bottle caps, shampoo bottles, computer chips, film reels, and even tennis balls are all clustered together to recreate the intricacies of his subjects' likeness. In the tradition of Pop artists like Andy Warhol, Delorme's favorite subjects are classic and modern day celebrities from Marylin Monroe to supermodel Kate Moss, though it's not their fame that concerns him the most.

French artist Renaud Delorme’s portraits lie somewhere between Pop Art, computer graphics and recycling. His mosaic-like images are made using an array of unconventional materials and found objects that he collects; everything from fabric, bottle caps, shampoo bottles, computer chips, film reels, and even tennis balls are all clustered together to recreate the intricacies of his subjects’ likeness. In the tradition of Pop artists like Andy Warhol, Delorme’s favorite subjects are classic and modern day celebrities from Marylin Monroe to supermodel Kate Moss, though it’s not their fame that concerns him the most. To him, there is a beauty in things that are ephemeral or serve a short-lived purpose, which he places in the context of timeless images. His manner of applying materials that result from our mass consumption also imply our over-advertised popular culture, and celebrities are representative of the kinds of items that he uses.





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