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Ryan De La Hoz Shows Greek-Inspired Illustrations in “Impassible Terrain”

San Francisco based artist Ryan De La Hoz (previously covered here) recently opened his new solo show, “Impassible Terrain” at FFDG. Consisting of new mixed media works and illustration, De La Hoz’s new body of work seeks to highlight our collective experiences through antiquity and traditional iconography. Using historical references to execute this personal ideology, De La Hoz’s new show rests on impactful yet simple motifs to convey broad concepts.


Ryan De La Hoz with his art on opening night at FFDG.

San Francisco based artist Ryan De La Hoz (previously covered here) recently opened his new solo show, “Impassible Terrain” at FFDG. Consisting of new mixed media works and illustration, De La Hoz’s new body of work seeks to highlight our collective experiences through antiquity and traditional iconography. Using historical references to execute this personal ideology, De La Hoz’s new show rests on impactful yet simple motifs to convey broad concepts.

With a bold, graphic approach, De La Hoz utilizes Greek and Roman symbols to show his viewers the temporal nature of our existence. Imagery of antique vases edging on the precipice of destruction and figures trapped in endless static isolation only further solidify this inherent link between the past and present. By situating these precious antique objects in harms way, De La Hoz is reminding us the impermanence and fragility of all things, no matter their origin.

To realize this concept in full form, De La Hoz approaches “Impassible Terrain” with incredible simplicity. Through mixed media, textile and even puzzles, De La Hoz conveys his highly-stylized world by way of minimalism. Incorporating commonplace materials with his signature post-internet aesthetic, De La Hoz’s new series communicates a direct message to his viewers, akin to a screen. Visually striking and steadfastly uncomplicated, De La Hoz integrates our past and present so to have us reflect on our current condition with a critical eye. “Impassible Terrain” is on view at FFDG through June 27th in San Francisco.

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