Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Miami Art Week 2015: Street Art Highlights from Wynwood

There was no escaping the madness that was Miami Art Week. While collectors and art fans alike were inside taking in all of the fairs and staying dry, more street artists than ever before descended upon the Wynwood area to leave their mark. Heavy rains and wind posed a challenge for most, but that could not keep artists like D*Face, Twoone, Nychos, Tristan Eaton, Boxhead, 1010, Caratoes, and countless others from killing several large-scale walls and collaborations. Take a look at our highlights from Wynwood after the jump!


The all-female “Wanter & Wayfare” wall in Wynwood, Miami. Photo by Rob Evans.

There was no escaping the madness that was Miami Art Week. While collectors and art fans alike were inside taking in all of the fairs and staying dry, more street artists than ever before descended upon the Wynwood area to leave their mark. Heavy rains and wind posed a challenge for most, but that could not keep artists like D*Face, Twoone, Nychos, Tristan Eaton, Boxhead, 1010, Caratoes, and countless others from killing several large-scale walls and collaborations. Among our favorite projects this year included the “Sea Walls: Murals for Oceans- Art Basel Miami” series, an entire block curated by Urban Nation and PangeaSeed Foundation, where murals by artists like James Bullough, Jason Botkin, NEVERCREW, Li-Hill, and Aaron Glasson addressed issues of climate on the world’s oceans. Another highlight was the all-female “Wander & Wayfare” wall, a collaboration between 7 female artists, which started as an idea by Hueman and was co-organized by Rocha Arts. Not far away, the Wynwood Walls complex was given a makeover as the Wynwood Walls Garden, which debuted with a special celebration featuring murals by 14 international artists including INTI, Alexis Diaz, Logan Hicks, The London Police, Miss Van, and a flowery installation by FAFI. Check out more of our street art highlights from Wynwood below.


Ian Ross and Tatiana Suarez. Photo by David Wilman.


Tatiana Suarez. Photo by David Wilman.


Alexis Diaz. Photo by David Wilman.


Alexis Diaz. Photo by David Wilman.


Ian Ross and Max Eherman aka “Eon75”. Photo by David Wilman.


Johnny Robles. Photo by David Wilman.


Boxhead. Photo by David Wilman.


Nychos. Photo by David Wilman.


Nychos. Photo by David Wilman.


Eduardo “Kobra”. Photo by David Wilman.


Kevin Ledo and Fin DAC. Photo by David Wilman.


Kevin Ledo and Fin DAC


Ben Eine


HOXXOH. Photo by David Wilman.


Max Ehrman. Photo by David Wilman.


Max Ehrman. Photo by David Wilman.


Richard Henderson AKA Hauser. Photo by David Wilman.


NOVE. Photo by David Wilman.


NOVE. Photo by David Wilman.


NOVE. Photo by Spoke Bike.


Mina & Zosen. Photo by Spoke Bike.


Twoone. Photo by Spoke Bike.


Jose Di Gregorio. Photo by David Wilman.


Aaron Glasson. Photo by David Wilman.


Jonny Alexander and Aaron Glasson. Photo by Enriqueta Arias.


NEVERCREW


James Bullough and Li-Hill. Photo courtesy the artists.


Bikismo. Photo by David Wilman.


Bikismo. Photo by Enriqueta Arias.


Esao Andrews. Photo by Enriqueta Arias.


INTI. Photo by Enriqueta Arias.


D*Face. Photo by Enriqueta Arias.


Caratoes


1010 and Caratoes. Photo by 1xRun.


Martin Whatson


Jason Botkin aka “KIN”. Photo courtesy the artist.


Typo


FAFI

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Isaac Cordal has been leaving his sculptures of tiny cement figures in cities all over the world for years. Featured on our blog, his artworks hidden in plain sight feature gloomy people wading helplessly in puddles, other times peering through cracks in the sidewalk and concrete walls. They are part of an ongoing series that he calls "Cement Eclipses". Cordal explains, "Cement Eclipses is a critical definition of our behavior as a social mass. The art work intends to catch the attention on our devalued relation with the nature through a critical look to the collateral effects of our evolution." The Spanish artist recently updated his site with his latest works, installed in New York City in November.
Howard Griffin Gallery is currently setting up "Perception," the debut London solo show of Iranian painter and muralist Medhi Ghadyanloo. For this show, the artist will create a full-scale sculptural installation at the gallery space and exhibit a new body of work that is loaded with symbolism. During his stay in London, the artist will be creating a series of outdoors murals around the British capital similar to the ones he's been creating in his hometown of Tehran.
A biographical fact Nychos often mentions in interviews is that he grew up in a family of traditional Austrian hunters. This explains the artist's lack of squeamishness: He seems to relish inventing characters and then slicing them open for his viewers to see. While it may be extreme for some, his grotesque display of cartoon violence speaks to the image-saturated, short attention spans of millennials who grew up on a steady diet of Ren and Stimpy and Ninja Turtles. Hot off the heels of his solo show at Fifty24SF in San Francisco, the artist recently traveled to Sao Paolo paint a new mural dubbed "Horsepower." The title is a nod to Nychos's energetic aesthetic and notoriously high-speed painting process. See progress photos of the new piece after the jump.
Upon the recent launch of the "Beyond the Streets" exhibition in New York City, which features more than 150 artists taking influence from and implementing graffiti and other street art forms, Zane Meyer of Chop 'Em Down Films offers a star-studded peek into the launch. Among the featured artists are Shepard Fairey, Cleon Peterson, Felipe Pantone, Guerrilla Girls, Kenny Scharf, Timothy Curtis, and many, many others.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List