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Handiedan’s New Wheat-Pasted Mural for Urban Nation Berlin

Amsterdam-based collage artist Handiedan recently visited Berlin to add her contribution to Urban Nation's Project M, arguably one of the coolest buildings in the German capital. The arts organization has been inviting artists to create window installations and large-scale murals (see our coverage of Eine's recent piece there) and Handiedan recently made her mark on the multi-story facade with an enormous, wheat-pasted mural. While her typical work consists of smaller-scale, textured collages of vintage pin-up girls with baroque flourishes, she seamlessly adapted this style to a larger format. Check out her piece and stay tuned for more coverage of her upcoming solo show "Vesica Piscis," opening at Seattle's Roq La Rue this Thursday.

Amsterdam-based collage artist Handiedan recently visited Berlin to add her contribution to Urban Nation’s Project M, arguably one of the coolest buildings in the German capital. The arts organization has been inviting artists to create window installations and large-scale murals (see our coverage of Eine’s recent piece there) and Handiedan recently made her mark on the multi-story facade with an enormous, wheat-pasted mural. While her typical work consists of smaller-scale, textured collages of vintage pin-up girls with baroque flourishes, she seamlessly adapted this style to a larger format. Check out her piece and stay tuned for more coverage of her upcoming solo show “Vesica Piscis,” opening at Seattle’s Roq La Rue this Thursday.

Photos by Henrik Haven and Handiedan.

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